WL Spraying

Fairway Greens



Kansas' Major Cities:

  • Wichita

  • Topeka

  • Salina

  • Hutchinson

  • Manhatta

  • Dodge City

  • Emporia

Kansas Lawns

Kansas is located in the Transition Zone which can grow some types of Cool Season Grasses, and some types of Warm Season Grasses.

Turfgrasses recommended for Kansas include:

COOL SEASON GRASSES

Tall Fescue

2nd Millennium
Coshise III
Forte
Matador
Tar Heel
Apache III
Dynasty
Guardian 21
Padre
Titanium
Avenger
Escalide
Inferno
Picasso
Ultimate
Bitmore
Falcon IV
Justice
Regiment II
Watchdog
Blackwatch
Fidelity
Kalahari
Rembrandt
Wolfpack
Cayenne
Finelawn Elite

High Quality Kentucky Bluegrass (recommended for their appearance)

Award
Champagne
Everest
Impact
NuGlade
Awesome
Champlain
Everglade
Liberator
Princeton 105
Beyond
Courtyard
Excursion
Midnight
Rambo
Bluestone
Diva
Glenmont
NuDestiny
Total Eclipse

Low maintenance Kentucky Bluegrass (recommended for limited watering requirements, but are not known for their high quality appearance)

Baron
Baronie
Caliber
Canterbury
Dragon
Eagelton
Kenblue
North Star
South Dakota

Creeping Bentgrass

Perennial Ryegrass

WARM SEASON GRASSES

Bermudagrass
Bermudagrass (seeded): Riviera, Yukon
Bermudagrass (sprigs / sod): Midlawn, Midiron, Patriot

Zoysiagrass
Zoysiagrass seed: Zenith in southern Kansas only
Zoysiagrass (sprigs / sod):: Meyer

Buffalograss
Buffalograss (seeded): Tantaka, Sharps Improved, Cody, Bison, Plains, Top Gun, Texoka
Buffalograss (sprigs / sod): 378, 315, Prairie, Buffalawn, 609

Common lawn diseases found in Kansas

Promoting healthy growth and avoiding conditions that cause stress to your turfgrass is the best way to prevent a severe disease outbreak. Stressed lawns are an open invitation for a lawn disease to gain a foothold. Optimal maintenance practices are the best way of avoiding stressed turfgrass.

Even if a pathogen is present in the soil, infection will not occur unless the environmental conditions are conducive to disease development. Once turf diseases have become active, they can cause heavy damage if not treated properly.

Cultural practices

Regular core aeration is recommended to reduce thatch buildup. Do not remove more than 1/3 of the turfgrass blade at any one mowing except the first mowing of bermuda in the spring-- at that time do not remove more than 1/2 of the blade.

Kansas Lawn Fertilization

Vigorously growing lawns use more nitrogen than what is available in the soil, so nitrogen must be replenished on a regular basis. Because of this high nitrogen requirement, lawn fertilization programs are built around this major nutrient. However, care must be used when and how often nitrogen is applied to the lawn. Excessive or untimely applications can lead to a shallow-rooted turfgrass that is more susceptible to diseases and has poor tolerance to environmental stresses like cold, heat and drought.

The other major nutrients include potash and phosphorus. The availability of these nutrients can only be determined through soil testing of the property. Soil sample should be sent to local Kansas State Research and Extension offices. These offices will give you complete instructions on how to take a soil sample as well as answer additional questions about the process.

Once the test is complete you'll receive the results as well as recommendations on how to adjust the phosphate and potash as well as adjusting the pH level for optimum growth.

All Kansas turfgrasses can survive on relatively low levels of nitrogen, but some require higher levels to look their best. Other species, namely zoysiagrass and buffalograss, perform their best with lower nitrogen levels.

Do not exceed the recommended nitrogen amount for your particular turfgrass. Too much nitrogen may be worse for your lawn than too little.

Fertilizer Scheduling

In general, turfgrasses should be fertilized when they are actively growing. So cool-season grasses, such as Kentucky bluegrass, tall fescue, and perennial ryegrass, should be fertilized primarily in the fall and late spring. Warm-season grasses, bermudagrass, buffalograss and zoysiagrass, should be fertilized in late spring and/or summer.

Cool season grasses have a tremendous growth in the spring. DO NOT FERTILIZE AT THIS TIME. Applying nitrogen before this spurt is over can cause the grass to grow too fast and the growth exhausts the plants ability to produce enough food and leaves little reserve for the summer ahead. In Kansas, wait until early to mid May before making any application of nitrogen. Additional fall fertilization should be made for cool season grasses.

Warm season grasses SHOULD BE FERTILIZED IN LATE SPRING, but no earlier. Fertilizing warm-season grasses too early encourages growth of cool-season weeds. For most of Kansas wait until at least May 15 to fertilize. late summer nitrogen applications to warm-season grasses can increase their susceptibility to winter-kill. So, do not apply nitrogen after August 15.